American Animal Care Center offers high quality, Low Cost Spay and Neuter to the residents of Fremont, Newark, Union City and surrounding Bay Area:

Visit us online to retrieve your very own new client coupon available for a limited time only:

American Animal Care Center

Best Veterinarian in Fremont CA

We are pleased to win Best Veterinarian in Fremont, Ca in 2011 again! We were voted best veterinarian by the readers of the Fremont Bulletin & The Argus (Bay Area News Group)!

American Animal Care Center is running spay/neuter promotions for low cost spay and neuter month. These spay packages have been bundled to give you maximum savings. Please schedule appointment quickly as these promotions won’t last long!american-animal-care-center-coupons-advertisement

Finding a good veterinarian is hard.  We have made a checklist for you to compare veterinarians when you are looking for a new veterinarian:

1. Is the Veterinarian AAHA Accredited?

You can search on  The top veterinary hospitals in the country tend to be AAHA accredited. This association has been the premier authority on accreditation in the United States.  AACC is AAHA Accredited.

2. How long has the business been in operation? Is this a brand new venture or is it an established business?

We have been in business since 1986.

3. Is the animal hospital a national corporation? Are they family owned? How does the animal hospital give back to the community?

American Animal Care Center gives tens of thousands back to local non-profits in the Tri-City areas.  We started with humble roots and have been a product of Fremont’s success. Community service and giving back are one of the pillars of values at American Animal Care Center. We were awarded small business of the year by the 20th assembly district.

4. Is the animal hospital available when I am? Are they open on weekends? Are they open in evenings? Do they offer early morning drop offs?

American Animal Care Center is open 7 days a week, 365 days a year including weekends and evenings.

Here’s more on why American Animal Care Center is the best veterinarian in the bay area.

Flea Control for Dogs & Cats

September 22, 2009

Flea Control is essential for pets year-round.  This is especially important in California where the fleas live year round, and never really die during the “winter.”

Prescription flea control available from your veterinarian is superior to the products available over the counter at the grocery store.

American Animal Care Center guarantees our prices on all flea control and we guarantee the product.  This comes with all of the manufacturer warranties.

Flea Products available include:

Advantage – kills fleas only

Advantix – kills fleas, ticks, & mosquitoes, DO NOT use in Cats!

Frontline Plus – kills fleas & ticks

Revolution – kills fleas, ear mites, helps with heartworm, & mange

Comfortis – a beef flavored monthly pill that prevents fleas, without topicals.

Here is a video from the staff at American Animal Care Center


Dr. Salwan: When disaster strikes, rescuers respond

By Dr. Raj Salwan
Oakland Tribune

Posted: 09/14/2009 05:06:15 PM PDT

Updated: 09/14/2009 08:08:40 PM PDT

In the event of natural disasters, millions of people rely on the first responders: police, fire and paramedic squads. Until recently, our animals often were left out of evacuations or rescues.

But today, first responders will have help from some very special animal response teams.

When wildfires ravage the West, the teams are there leading horses and livestock to safety. When floods drown the Midwest, they are there rescuing pets and settling them in temporary shelters. And, when the fierce winds of hurricanes and tornadoes devastate whole communities, once again they are there to help with animal rescue efforts.

“They” are the thousands of volunteers who put aside their jobs and family to help save animals when Mother Nature, or human folly, wreaks havoc.

Finding people to help pets has never been difficult, but recent rough storm seasons and continuing wildfires have taught us that disaster responders and temporary shelters often are woefully unprepared to cope with both people and their pets.

Many animal welfare groups and official Veterinary Medical Assistance Teams often are available to lend aid, but coordination with authorities often is lacking.

Fortunately, a landmark meeting between the National Animal Rescue and Sheltering Coalition, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and many other groups has led to a proposed plan to incorporate the animal coalition membersinto emergency operations in the event of a large scale disaster.

This means that there will be an increased level of awareness, coordination and efficiency for dealing with animals during these tragic situations.

And even beyond natural disasters, many of these rescue teams will help with large groups of animals freed from puppy mills; and criminal activities such as dogfighting kennels; or even animal-hoarding cases.

These animal rescuers are unpaid volunteers who sacrifice a great deal to help the four-legged victims of disasters.

Red Star Animal Emergency Services, as an example, has a roster of more than 100 deployable volunteers who have undergone intense training and are able to help with urban searches, flood recovery tasks, and even veterinary surgery capabilities in their specialized “Rescue Rig.”

American Humane Association also asks that their volunteers complete online training through FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute.

Beyond the need for manpower on-site, disasters often mean that local shelters, veterinarians and other animal agencies are low on medicine and supplies. In addition to logistical and delivery problems, purchasing and delivering relief supplies is also a huge challenge.

Thankfully, the pet and veterinary industries have stepped up to answer the call for money and support through public awareness. After the severe 2005 storm season, the Paws to Save Pets program was created along with the Foundation and the American Veterinary Medical Foundation.

We should make sure our family, pets and all, are ready to evacuate. Ask you veterinarian about needed vaccinations, preventive care, and proper identification so that you won’t be caught without these when disaster strikes.

Dr. Raj Salwan, a second-generation veterinarian, has been around veterinary medicine for more than 21 years. He can be reached at

Salwan: When pets who roam don’t come home
By Raj Salwan
Oakland Tribune
Posted: 08/25/2009 12:00:00 AM PDT
Updated: 09/01/2009 08:05:16 AM PDT

WITH our impressive array of technologies, like GPS and “smart” phones, you might think that finding a lost pet is getting easier each year.

Sadly, the odds are still against many missing pets ever making it back home.

Isn’t there some way to ensure that your pet will return safely from his wandering?

Everyone loves the amazing stories of dogs and cats that travel long distances to find their way back home or even locate their owners in a new city.

Unfortunately, these happy tales are the rare exception to the rule. For every pet that makes it back after leaving, there are tens of thousands who never live to see home again.

Humane groups and pet industry experts estimate that more than 5 million pets will be lost this year. One pet in every three will be lost at some point in his or her lifetime.

Of those that roam away from home, less than 17 percent of the dogs and only 2 percent of the cats ever make it back to their owners, according to the American Humane Association.

Sadly, most of the rest will be euthanized in overcrowded animal shelters. Newspapers and online ads still tell the sad story of some youngster’s lost pet every day.

Why do we see a continuation of this problem year after year?

First, despite leash laws and other ordinances, many families are reluctant to chain their dogs or attempt to keep their cats from roaming. This is especially true in rural

Compounding the issue is that there are more than 200 million pets in North America and only a very small percentage have some form of permanent identification.

ID tags and collars are easily removed by unscrupulous individuals or even by the pet in some instances. Microchips help to ensure that the pet has some means of identification, but even these implants aren’t foolproof.

In fact, it is a rare pet that actually has a microchip. According to industry data, only about 5 percent of all pets in North America have microchips. And even the pets with chips aren’t necessarily any safer.

When owners fail to register their pet properly, reunions are delayed or even prevented in many instances. Again, experts from all major microchip companies state that less than 50 percent of chipped pets are registered with correct and current information.

Other forms of identification, such as tattooing, are very rare and obscure. This fact means that a shelter employee or veterinary office may not even note the presence of a tattoo.

Finally, even though they have good intentions, shelters and rescues are often overwhelmed with pets. A microchip could be missed during a hurried exam, or a description of your lost pet might not match what the employee sees in front of him.

Despite these overwhelming odds, you can proactively help ensure that your pet will make it safely home.

First, like so many things, prevention and preparation go a long way.

Neuter your pet to decrease his roaming urges and consider using both ID tags and a microchip.

We all want our family members to stay close to home and to heart. But, like all children, our pets love exploration and adventure, too.

Work with your veterinarian to make sure all your pets are properly identified with tags and/or microchips.

Dr Salwan is a veterinarian at American Animal Care Center

June 16, 2009

#meowmondays @morriscat @JavaTheCat @katieboocat HenrytheCat2002 @GrandmaStormy @Luckzilla @Mocha_Kitten @BenzenetheCat @ForrestTheCat

May 21, 2009

What is Cats in Sinks? It’s obvious. It’s about cats. And kittens. Who like sinks. And basins. Please submit photos ASAP.