American Animal Care Center

Best Veterinarian in Fremont CA

We are pleased to win Best Veterinarian in Fremont, Ca in 2011 again! We were voted best veterinarian by the readers of the Fremont Bulletin & The Argus (Bay Area News Group)!

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hurricane

Dr. Salwan: When disaster strikes, rescuers respond

By Dr. Raj Salwan
Oakland Tribune

Posted: 09/14/2009 05:06:15 PM PDT

Updated: 09/14/2009 08:08:40 PM PDT

In the event of natural disasters, millions of people rely on the first responders: police, fire and paramedic squads. Until recently, our animals often were left out of evacuations or rescues.

But today, first responders will have help from some very special animal response teams.

When wildfires ravage the West, the teams are there leading horses and livestock to safety. When floods drown the Midwest, they are there rescuing pets and settling them in temporary shelters. And, when the fierce winds of hurricanes and tornadoes devastate whole communities, once again they are there to help with animal rescue efforts.

“They” are the thousands of volunteers who put aside their jobs and family to help save animals when Mother Nature, or human folly, wreaks havoc.

Finding people to help pets has never been difficult, but recent rough storm seasons and continuing wildfires have taught us that disaster responders and temporary shelters often are woefully unprepared to cope with both people and their pets.

Many animal welfare groups and official Veterinary Medical Assistance Teams often are available to lend aid, but coordination with authorities often is lacking.

Fortunately, a landmark meeting between the National Animal Rescue and Sheltering Coalition, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and many other groups has led to a proposed plan to incorporate the animal coalition membersinto emergency operations in the event of a large scale disaster.

This means that there will be an increased level of awareness, coordination and efficiency for dealing with animals during these tragic situations.

And even beyond natural disasters, many of these rescue teams will help with large groups of animals freed from puppy mills; and criminal activities such as dogfighting kennels; or even animal-hoarding cases.

These animal rescuers are unpaid volunteers who sacrifice a great deal to help the four-legged victims of disasters.

Red Star Animal Emergency Services, as an example, has a roster of more than 100 deployable volunteers who have undergone intense training and are able to help with urban searches, flood recovery tasks, and even veterinary surgery capabilities in their specialized “Rescue Rig.”

American Humane Association also asks that their volunteers complete online training through FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute.

Beyond the need for manpower on-site, disasters often mean that local shelters, veterinarians and other animal agencies are low on medicine and supplies. In addition to logistical and delivery problems, purchasing and delivering relief supplies is also a huge challenge.

Thankfully, the pet and veterinary industries have stepped up to answer the call for money and support through public awareness. After the severe 2005 storm season, the Paws to Save Pets program was created along with the Petfinders.com Foundation and the American Veterinary Medical Foundation.

We should make sure our family, pets and all, are ready to evacuate. Ask you veterinarian about needed vaccinations, preventive care, and proper identification so that you won’t be caught without these when disaster strikes.

Dr. Raj Salwan, a second-generation veterinarian, has been around veterinary medicine for more than 21 years. He can be reached at  www.americananimalcare.com.

Living with Feline Leukemia

Feline leukemia (FeLV), a widespread, incurable virus that typically suppresses a cat’s immune system, is the most common cause of cancer in cats. Although some cats are able to eliminate the virus on their own and develop immunity, many others die as a result of cancer or opportunistic infections.
      The disease is spread from cat to cat through bites; mutual grooming; and sharing food or water dishes and litter boxes. Kittens can also contract the virus from their mothers.
      FeLV is species-specific, so humans and dogs are not at risk.
      In 2006, the Winn Feline Foundation reported that 3% of cats in single-cat homes were infected with FeLV. Infection rates are dramatically higher among stray cats and in homes where cats are allowed outside.
      FeLV is highly contagious, so it is important to have your cat vaccinated if it could be exposed to other cats. The American Association of Feline Practitioners recommends all kittens receive the vaccine.
      Infected cats may harbor the illness for several years with no signs of illness. Over time, they may lose weight, become depressed, or develop a fever. Their coats often deteriorate, and they may develop skin, bladder, or upper respiratory infections.
      Your veterinarian can diagnose the disease by conducting a simple blood test called an ELISA.
      Cats infected with the virus live an average of three years.
      “Many of these cats can live reasonably healthy lives for a number of years if they receive proper care,” says Fred Scott, DVM, PhD, interim director of the Cornell Feline Health Center in Ithaca, N.Y.
      If your cat is infected, good nutrition and a stress-free environment are essential.
      “Your veterinarian will talk to you about the importance of maintaining a balanced diet. Also, he or she will ask you about your cat’s lifestyle and look for ways to reduce stress,” Scott explains.
      Scott strongly recommends that infected cats be kept indoors so they won’t spread the virus. If you have multiple cats, have all of them tested, vaccinate any that are not infected, and consider housing infected cats separately.
      “Your veterinarian will want to see your cat on a more frequent basis [than a healthy cat], say, every six months,” says Scott.
      “Between check-ups, stay alert to your cat’s body condition. Once a month, rub your hand over its ribs. You should be able to feel them, but they shouldn’t stand out.”
      If you notice any changes in your cat’s health or behavior, notify your veterinarian immediately.

No more pilling fights?
One-Shot Antibiotic Makes Life Easier

If you search YouTube for the word pill with cat or dog, you’ll get about 500 hits, ranging from silly spoofs to instructional videos that are painfully, unintentionally hilarious.
But administering daily pills to your cat or dog is no fun at all. As a matter of fact, it is so difficult that many pet owners give up.
Of course when treatment is cut short, illnesses may linger or worsen. And if the discontinued pill is an antibiotic, the threat is even broader.
If you prematurely stop giving your pet an antibiotic, some bacteria will survive and develop a resistance to the medication. This is one cause of the much-publicized increase in virulent, antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
In June, Pfizer, a leading veterinary drug manufacturer, introduced Convenia, the only single-injection antibiotic available for pets.
Used to treat certain types of skin infections in dogs and cats, Convenia has the potential to make life a lot easier for affected pets and their owners. One injection delivers a full, two-week course of antibiotics and eliminates the need for oral medication.
That should do away with the pill fights. No worries. That still leaves about 35,000 cat and dog videos on YouTube.
AAHA

Routine Health Examinations Are Necessary!!!

“An ounce of prevention…”

Remember the old saying, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”? That happens to be as true for the health of your pet as it is for any member of your family!

Annual health examinations will help determine the general well being of your pet and identify potential problems. Early detection ensures prompt action that may solve the problem before serious consequences occur and may prevent suffering.

The gradual onset of health problems in an apparently healthy pet often go unnoticed. Once symptoms appear, the condition may be too difficult or costly to diagnose and treat. Age is not a disease; however, there are many conditions, that if diagnosed early, can be completely reversed or controlled for extended periods of time.

At least once and perhaps twice a year, your pet needs a complete physical examination. Remember, your pet’s lifespan is shorter than ours. A lot can happen in 12 months.

Due to the many recent discoveries and innovations in veterinary medicine, your pet can be protected from most major diseases. Today, many immunizations and preventive treatments are available that did not exist just a few years ago. The staff at American Animal Care Center can help you decide what preventive measures are necessary for your pet(s).